Sh1 Shuttle one

Sh2 Shuttle two

A decorative or connecting picot, its height is about the length of three double stitches.

—— A decorative or connecting picot, its height is double the length of —.

——— A decorative or connecting picot, its height is triple the length of —, or approximately 5/16 inch. 

———— A decorative or connecting picot, its height is quadruple the length of —, or approximately 3/8 inch to 1/2 inch. 

- A construction or connecting picot, its height is the length of one double stitch.

-- A construction or connecting picot, its height is double the length of -.

—- A decorative or connecting picot, its height is the sum of the lengths of — and -.

—-- A decorative or connecting picot, its height is the sum of the lengths of — and --.

+ An indication to join elements through a picot or the base of a ring. It is used for the picot join, SLJ, and SRJ.

^ When making a split ring (SR), it denotes the stitches of Sh1 and Sh2. For example, SR 5^5 indicates five double stitches with Sh1 and five double stitches with Sh2. 

X An indication to repeat the number of double stitches in a ring or a chain. For example, R 5 X 4 means to repeat four times the making of five double stitches followed by a picot. It is the same as R 5—5—5—5.

d First half stitch 

s Second half stitch

5d/5s An indication to make five first half stitches followed by five second half stitches. 

5s/5d An indication to make five second half stitches followed by five first half stitches.

* * An indication to repeat the content between * and *. It is also an indication to repeat the content between * and * to the end of the round.

*** *** An indication to repeat the content between *** and *** to the end of the round. It is used when * and * is also used in the same round to differentiate the two.

<> An indication to copy the instructions between < and >. In a single round, the first instance of < and > will show instructions between them. The second instance will only show <> with no instructions between them. 

{} Denotes a clover leaf consisting of adjacent rings. 

R Ring

Ch Chain

p Picot

RW Reverse work is an indication to turn over the work vertically. It occurs when making a chain after a ring and when making a ring after a chain in the traditional way. Since making a chain is possible on the right side with the wrapping double stitch, RW has not been used in most of the patterns, with the exception of a few of the patterns in order to indicate direction. 

JR A Josephine ring is a ring made with first half stitches when on the right side of the work and with second half stitches when on the wrong side of the work.

JK A Josephine knot is a chain made with first half stitches when on the right side of the work and with second half stitches when on the wrong side of the work.

SLJ If the next round starts with SR after SLJ, continue the work. Otherwise, SLJ implies finishing the work by hiding the ends.

Hide Ends Cut thread and use a needle to sew it into adjacent stitches. Then, use a small dab of tacky glue to secure thread to work.

SR A split ring is used to start a new round that continues from the previous round. 

Tat the first half of a ring with Sh1 and drop Sh1. Hand Sh1 over the back of the left hand. Turn the hand thread counter-clockwise. Pinch the area of the first double stitch. With Sh2, tat the desired number of wrapping double stitches. Close the split ring with Sh1.

SCh A split chain is used on the last chain in a round of a work. It is a new technique that makes it possible to move from one round to another without cutting thread. After making the desired number of knots of a chain in the usual way, make the remaining number of knots of the same chain backwards with the shuttle. Do the up-SLJ to the base of the first ring of the round, leaving thread space to make the remaining knots. Pull the shuttle from front to back, making a loop, and send the shuttle from front to back. It becomes the first half stitch. Leave the loop loose. Pull the shuttle from back to front to make the loop again and send the shuttle from back to front. It becomes the second half stitch. Tighten the thread tension of the first and second half stitches. 

If a split chain happens to be on the right side, do the down-SLJ along with the steps involved in reverse order.

MR A mock ring is a chain that resembles a ring. To make a mock ring, form a loop about 2 inches long with the shuttle thread downward. Pinch the end point with the thumb and index finger of the left hand and start a new chain. Then pull the shuttle through the formed loop from back to front. Tighten the chain to form a mock ring.

MP A mock picot is used in the following two cases: 

First Case: Where a regular picot cannot be made either at the base of a ring or the inside of a chain, make thread space with a paper clip before starting a ring or a chain. 

Second Case: When making a ring with a specified number of picots, make the last picot using the lock stitch technique. Using a single shuttle, leave 6 inches of thread space when starting a ring. Use the thread space as the shuttle thread. Using two shuttles, use Sh2 as the shuttle thread. This technique makes it possible to move on to the next step without cutting thread. 

Example: If a ring has six picots, make five picots and close the ring. Make the sixth picot (mock picot) using the lock stitch technique with the thread space or Sh2 as the shuttle thread. 

SLT The shoe lace trick is a simple technique to exchange the positions of the shuttle thread and the hand thread, and resembles the movement of tying a shoe lace. The hand thread becomes the shuttle thread and vice versa. It is necessary when making a direct chain without reversing the work or when matching colors when two different colors are being used.

Lock Stitch A lock stitch is a technique to prevent knots from moving, and is used when making a mock picot. To make a lock stitch, start with the second half of a wrapping stitch followed by the second half of a flipping stitch.